Copyright Rights? Broadcast Rights? What of Human Rights?

Able are broadcasting live captions for the extended TVNZ One News midday broadcast of the All Blacks homecoming. I should feel ‘happy’. Instead I feel mad. TVNZ – still the only New Zealander broadcaster with the technical capability to support live captioning. The All Blacks arrived at Auckland Airport this morning. Breakfast television and many kiwis were there to meet them. No captions. No captions on breakfast TV news or.

How Many People Would Benefit from Captioning in New Zealand? Statistics vary across the world but it is commonly thought that 1 in 6 has a degree of hearing loss.

We’ve been asked this a lot recently so here are some stats. As this campaign is run purely on a voluntary basis so no flashy infographics from us sorry…. • NZ Stats say 380,000 New Zealanders are Deaf/HOH – 8.5 % of the population. • 1 in 3 people over the age of 65 are affected by disabling hearing loss. In 2009, 13% of the NZ population was over the.

7 Days of Captioning in New Zealand – Should Stenography be used for Live Captioning?

Captions give access. We love New Zealand and would like it to be an inclusive and accessible place for all Deaf & Hard of Hearing New Zealanders. Here’s some ‘highlights’ over the last week. Thursday 28 August – Lightbox, the new subscription video on demand service from Spark New Zealand launches – unfortunately without captioning. According to Lightbox, the cost to caption is prohibitive. (In its former guise, the company.

Lack of Access for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing… “I am told that the government cares about inclusion, that my perception is not reality. I am just not convinced.”

OK I admit it. I am struggling to reconcile something. On one side of the reconciliation I have government departments and agencies purporting to champion inclusion and embrace diversity. On the other side I have the Minister of Broadcasting effectively telling the New Zealand Captioning Working Group to (I paraphrase) ‘shove off’. As far as I can work out, there are at least 4 government ministries and endless government ministers.

An open response from the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Communities in New Zealand to the Rt Hon Craig Foss, Minister of Broadcasting…

On 20 March 2014 MP Mojo Mathers asked the Minister of Broadcasting in Parliament “Did he think that television programmes made with public funds should be screened with captions so that New Zealanders with hearing loss can watch them?” On behalf of the Hon Craig Foss, Hon Dr Johnathan Coleman responded as in bold below. Point by point we will now respond to the Hon Craig Foss. Government supports captioning.

Why Do We Actually Need Closed Captions? “We need the Government to step up and legislate, making captioning compulsory in both the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act.”

Our Captioning campaign is getting heard in many places both nationally and internationally, but some people don’t understand what we are campaigning for. So here goes – our way of explaining what we need. 1). Legislation. We need the Government to step up and legislate, making captioning compulsory in both the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act. Why? Because the rate of broadcast captioning over a 24 hour period in.

Joining In… Why Captioning ALL TV Programmes is Important. “100% captioning isn’t just about entertainment and watching TV. It’s about access to information and providing a tool that makes it easier for Deaf and hearing impaired people to join in and participate with everyone else.”

Some people may wonder about the current campaign for 100% captions on TV. Is it really an important issue? It’s just TV programmes. Aren’t there more important things to worry about? Besides, some programmes are already captioned. Shouldn’t that be enough? So why do so many Deaf and hard of hearing people think it is important? I don’t like to assume I can speak for others, but to me it’s.